Judicial Arbitration

Arbitration is effective when parties want someone other than themselves to decide the outcome. In arbitration, a neutral arbitrator hears arguments and evidence from each side and then decides the outcome of the dispute. Arbitration is less formal than a trial, and the rules of evidence are often relaxed.

In Judicial Arbitration (non-binding) an independent attorney (arbitrator) looks at the evidence, listens to the parties and their witnesses, and decides how the case will be resolved. The arbitrator's award is not binding but will become a binding court judgment unless a party asks the court for a new trial (called a trial de novo) OR a dismissal within 60 days of the award.

Non-binding arbitration allows the parties to see a potential outcome and accept it, decide to continue settlement negotiations, or proceed to trial. In nonbinding arbitration, if a party requests a trial and does not receive a more favorable result at trial than in arbitration, there may be penalties.

If you have chosen or have been ordered to Judicial Arbitration, the court will send you a list of judicial arbitrators and instructions for using the service. Click on a name below to review the background and experience of the arbitrator. Use the "Back" button to return to the list of Judicial Arbitrators.

If you have been provided a list of arbitrators and they are not listed below or their information is unavailable, please contact the ADR Program via e-mail at adrprogram@alameda.courts.ca.gov or via telephone at
(510) 891-6055 for the arbitrator's details.